KYSHTYM DWARF

mayak

From our Russian Division led by fmt:

>SOURCE.

>SOURCE II.

Aleshenka Erashov (Russian: Алёшенька, Alyoshenka, a hypocoristic for the Russian male first name Alexey) was a small creature allegedly found in the village of Kaolinovy, near Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia in August 1996. Aleshenka was found by an old woman, Tamara Vasilievna Prosvirina, who was mentally ill. The creature had an unusual appearance, giving rise to rumors of its extraterrestrial origin. The local population readily supported this rumor, collecting easy money from reporters for interviews – at least two Japanese companies (Asahi TV and MTV Japan) made documentaries about the creature.

Physical appearance

Aleshenka was a greyish creature about twenty-five centimeters (9.8 in) in length. Its hairless head had a number of dark spots. The eyes were large, occupying most of the face. It breathed through a small nose below the eyes.

Later incidents

A few days after the discovery, Tamara Prosvirina was admitted to a psychiatric hospital for treatment, and Aleshenka’s corpse (the time and cause of death unknown) was passed on to local militsiya (police) by a neighbour. In 1999, Prosvirina was killed in an automobile accident in an attempt to escape the hospital.

Investigation

Very little is known about what happened to Aleshenka Erashov’s remains, and accounts of its death and appearance vary greatly. A local ufologist claimed that the corpse was taken away by a UFO inhabited by members of Aleshenka’s species. Some skeptics hold that it was bought by a wealthy collector of curiosities. A doctor from the local hospital who had allegedly seen the corpse claimed that it corresponded to a normal 20-25 week human foetus, prematurely born. It could have lived for several hours, but not several weeks, contrary to Prosvirina’s claims.[2]

According to genetic experts at the Moscow Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, DNA analysis of the clothes Aleshenka was wrapped in revealed no evidence that “he” was extraterrestrial. On April 15, 2004, the scientists made an official statement that the “Kyshtym creature” was a premature female human infant, with severe deformities.[3]

The Kyshtym disaster of 1957 (Level 6 on the International Nuclear Event Scale) seriously contaminated the area with radiation and greatly affected the health of local population. Strange deformities of a human fetus could possibly be caused by long-term effects of radiation.

PRAVDA – SOURCE .

IF ALIENS DO EXIST THEY TARGET POLLUTED CONTAMINATED AREAS :
WHY ?

>SOURCE.

The Kyshtym disaster was a radiation contamination incident that occurred on 29 September 1957 at Mayak, a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in the Soviet Union. It measured as a Level 6 disaster on the International Nuclear Event Scale, making it the third most serious nuclear accident ever recorded (after the Chernobyl disaster, and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, both Level 7 on the INES). The event occurred in the town of Ozyorsk, a closed city built around the Mayak plant. Since Ozyorsk/Mayak (also known as Chelyabinsk-40 and Chelyabinsk-65) was not marked on maps, the disaster was named after Kyshtym, the nearest known town.

After World War II, the Soviet Union lagged behind the US in development of nuclear weapons, so it started a rapid research and development program to produce a sufficient amount of weapons-grade uranium and plutonium. The Mayak plant was built in haste between 1945 and 1948. Gaps in Soviet physicists’ knowledge about nuclear physics at the time made it difficult to judge the safety of many decisions. Environmental concerns were not taken seriously during the early development stage. All six reactors were on Lake Kyzyltash and used an open cycle cooling system, discharging irradiated water directly back into the lake.Initially Mayak was dumping high-level radioactive waste into a nearby river, which was taking waste to the river Ob, flowing further down to the Arctic Ocean. Later Lake Karachay was used for open-air storage.

A storage facility for liquid nuclear waste was added around 1953. It consisted of steel tanks mounted in a concrete base, 8.2 meters underground. Because of the high level of radioactivity, the waste was heating itself through decay heat (though a chain reaction was not possible). For that reason, a cooler was built around each bank containing 20 tanks. Facilities for monitoring operation of the coolers and the content of the tanks were inadequate.

Explosion

On 29 September 1957, the cooling system in one of the tanks containing about 70–80 tons of liquid radioactive waste failed and was not repaired. The temperature in it started to rise, resulting in evaporation and a chemical explosion of the dried waste, consisting mainly of ammonium nitrate and acetates (see ammonium nitrate bomb). The explosion, estimated to have a force of about 70–100 tons of TNT threw the concrete lid, weighing 160 tons, into the air.[3] There were no immediate casualties as a result of the explosion, but it released an estimated 20 MCi (800 PBq) of radioactivity. Most of this contamination settled out near the site of the accident and contributed to the pollution of the Techa River, but a plume containing 2 MCi (80 PBq) of radionuclides spread out over hundreds of kilometers.[4] The affected area was not virgin – the Techa river had previously received 2 ¾ MCi (100 PBq) of deliberately dumped waste, and Lake Karachay had received 120 MCi (4000 PBq).

In the next 10 to 11 hours, the radioactive cloud moved towards the north-east, reaching 300–350 kilometers from the accident. The fallout of the cloud resulted in a long-term contamination of an area of more than 800 to 20,000 square kilometers, (depending on what contamination level is considered significant,) primarily with caesium-137 and strontium-90.[2] This area is usually referred to as the East-Ural Radioactive Trace (EURT).

Because of the secrecy surrounding Mayak, the populations of affected areas were not initially informed of the accident. A week later (on 6 October) an operation for evacuating 10,000 people from the affected area started, still without giving an explanation of the reasons for evacuation.

Although vague reports of a “catastrophic accident” causing “radioactive fallout over the Soviet and many neighboring states” began appearing in the western press between 13 and 14 April 1958, it was only in 1976 that Zhores Medvedev made the nature and extent of the disaster known to the world.[7][8] In the absence of verifiable information, exaggerated accounts of the disaster were given. People “grew hysterical with fear with the incidence of unknown ‘mysterious’ diseases breaking out. Victims were seen with skin ‘sloughing off’ their faces, hands and other exposed parts of their bodies.”Medvedev’s description of the disaster in the New Scientist was initially derided by western nuclear industry sources, but the core of his story was soon confirmed by Professor Leo Tumerman, former head of the Biophysics Laboratory at the Institute of Molecular Biology in Moscow.


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